Reviews

Content Burns

The newest novel – Content Burns by Stephanie A. Smith

Content Burns

Content Burns: A riveting story of loss, trauma, and personal identity

Content Burns is the final work in an absolutely outstanding trilogy by Stephanie A. Smith. While this book certainly remains true to the themes and inspirations of the entire trilogy, it also stands alone as a unique narrative with character arcs and storylines independent from the other two novels. Do not hesitate to purchase this book; however, do also read Warpaint and Baby Rocket when you have the chance. They are equally as excellent.

Smith beautifully incorporates themes of identity, trauma, and loss throughout Content Burns. The novel follows the story of two women united by the same name, Burns, but separated by their historical and cultural experiences and differences. The stories are riveting. I was especially engulfed by Cabbi’s narrative, a tale of the national and personal horrors of 9/11 and the sense of trauma and loss she faces in the wake of this tragedy. It is rare to find such honest, heartfelt, and brave writing.

Typical of Smith’s work, Content Burns engages historical truths and realistic detail in a way that completely absorbs the reader in the events of the past. Her writing is well-researched which is especially apparent in her descriptions of the life of the Pequot Indians, an important part of the novel. The very last chapter (and passage) is especially brilliant. I highly recommend this book. Smith has so much to say about love, tragedy, personal identity, and the experience of loss. As always, she is a joy to read. The writing and characters of Content Burns really do leave their mark on the reader.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Melissa – August 1, 2014
This review is from: Content Burns (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews


Baby Rocket

Baby Rocket, a novel by Stephanie A. Smith

Baby Rocket, a novel by Stephanie A. Smith

“Baby Rocket”

Review by
Mom’s Small Victories

Book Review: Historical Fiction Set During the Space Race: Baby Rocket by Stephanie Smith

What I enjoyed about the book was that Lem’s childhood took place during the great Space Race. As a kid, I was fascinated by astronomy and wanted to be an astronaut when I grew up. I dreamed of going to Space Camp. In the story, Lem is a historian writing about NASA’s female astronauts and I enjoyed learning about their role in NASA. As a child in the 80′s, I remember how exciting it was to have a teacher on board the Challenger and how heartbreaking it was when the shuttle exploded. I enjoy historical fiction and Baby Rocket covered a different time period than I had read about before. [Read the full review]

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Tanya M. – July 18, 2014
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Mom’s Small Victories Reviews

Absolutely adore this book!

This was a quick and enjoyable read for me. I read Baby Rocket in one sitting. Absolutely adore this book! Clementine steals the spotlight. She is such a sweet and endearing character. I love how Marilyn Monroe was so integral to this story. The storyline is something that I think we can all relate to. A traumatic childhood that we have no memory of, loved ones meeting tragic ends and having to find your way through life with many of the puzzle pieces missing. If you want something different, give Baby Rocket a go! You won’t be disappointed.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Amanda Haury – April 12, 2014
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Bibliophile Book Reviews

Like a Diamond in the Sky

Smith’s novel is a rare constellation of storytelling to behold. She perfectly draws the lines from star to star as the story unfolds from one gripping moment to the next. The novel is crafted so carefully – the intricacies are brilliant, the writing swift and poignant, and the multi-threaded story woven together at just the right pace. Talk about a page turner! I feel as though I know Clementine Dance, the woman at the center of the novel. You will, too. You will feel every turn, downward slope, and upward swing of Clementine’s surprising journey to know the truth about her mother, a train, and Baby Rocket. Smith’s novel asks questions about how the past shapes us and constantly forces us to either confront history or let sleeping dogs lie. And, so much like the Marilyn of her father’s memory, Clementine comes out of the disorienting fog that can be life and reminds us about our glittering dreams… and why we relentlessly hold on to them. Must read! A story like this does not come along often.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Electra Grey – January 20, 2014
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Great book that incorporates Marilyn into contemporary life, writing grabs you from chapter one. Page turner!

What an amazing book! This book is one of the most well written and interesting books I read this past year, I honestly couldn’t put it down. The story has several wonderful things to offer. The author obviously has a wonderful knowledge of American history which she incorporates throughout her main character’s (Lem) story. Although the book is never pedantic or showy about the writer’s knowledge, it still engages the reader on historical issues and I learned a few things reading this book without even trying (mostly about American history in the 50’s and 60’s). A fan of Marilyn Monroe, I originally bought this book thinking it had something to do with her life, and it does, but Stephanie manages to incorporate Marilyn mythology into her primary character’s story in such a believing and interesting way that I think it might be my favorite book about Marilyn Monroe that isn’t really about Marilyn. I’ll be reading this one again soon. The story follows one woman who has discovered some pretty insane family secrets and cover-ups and the story ends with a great twist ending (I was completely shocked). Awesome story, great writing, if you love to read, you’ll love it!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By books n’ things – January 4, 2014
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Heart-gripping

I downloaded Baby Rocket to my iPhone and read it in one day. It was a compulsive read and near the end I was flipping pages in a race to the finish. Every family has its secrets, but the story of Clementine Dance’s struggle to make sense of her family history after a dark secret comes to light will stick with you for a long time. Well-written, lucid, and richly textured Baby Rocket is a gripping tale that unspools like a good mystery with twists and turns that will spur you on, but it is the character of Clementine Dance that will hook you. Clementine is an endearing character, smart and funny, shy and vulnerable, sensitive and brave. Like Marilyn Monroe who is woven into the novel, Clementine is a character so damaged by her childhood that one wonders how she will survive her search into the dark corners of her family past for answers. Answers that can only be found by taking the reader on a journey back into America’s past where we come to understand the hopes and dreams of the men and women, and the nation in the early years of space program. This journey is central to the book’s core, and the author does an excellent job of recreating with vivid prose and well researched descriptions the public’s fascination with outer space and how it captured the imagination of ordinary people in the Sixties. I won’t spoil the book for you, but the ending will surprise you.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By NJ Byrne – August 9, 2013
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Va-va-va-voom!

Fly me to the moon! The author has a passion for history and story that shines in this novel as much as it did in the first book of the trilogy, Warpaint. If you haven’t read Warpaint yet, I highly reccomend it for it’s wonderful emotional depth and memorable characters; however, Baby Rocket is great as a stand-alone novel as well. With themes about abandonment, gender, the space-race, and identity, this novel is sure to keep you in orbit beginning to end. Stephanie Smith knows story, and this one ends with a punch.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Natacha Malakoff “STELLA5000” – August 2, 2013
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Reviewed By Bil Howard for Readers’ Favorite
This is one of three reviewers who awarded 5 stars from Readers’ Favorite.

5 star seal - Readers' Favorite

This book received a 5 Star Review rating from Readers’ Favorite.

Our roots aren’t always what we assume them to be. Such was the case with Clementine “Lem” Dance, who believed that James Walter Dance was her real father and that there was a mystery behind why he never talked about her mother. In Baby Rocket, Stephanie A. Smith chronicles Lem’s search for the truth about her mother and why her father had kept the truth from her. After her father dies of a heart attack, Lem discovers files about an abandoned child on Cape Canaveral in 1966. She soon learns that she was that child and that her father had been piecing together the mystery of what happened to her mother for years. A women’s historian who is writing a book about Mercury 9, she knows how to track down the information she needs to finish piecing together the mystery of her who her real parents are. Her journey takes her from California to the Tri-State area to Florida and finally Martha’s Vineyard, but it also takes her on an emotional ride as she searches for answers to the questions that have suddenly overtaken her life.

Baby Rocket presents a very frightening realization to a young woman whose life is completely turned upside down. Stephanie A. Smith has done an excellent job of drawing upon the assault of emotions that would engulf a person who just discovered that nothing in their life was what they had believed it to be. Full of drama and suspense, the mysterious intrigue of searching for the truth behind where she came from grips the reader and holds on tight. Tragic, suspenseful and realistic, Baby Rocket will keep you turning pages as you sink deeper and deeper into solving this mystery of emotional proportions.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Bil Howard – June 4, 2014
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Readers’ Favorite Reviews

Reviewed By Jeffrey Brooke-Stewart for Readers’ Favorite
This is one of three reviewers who awarded 5 stars from Readers’ Favorite.

5 star seal - Readers' Favorite

This book received a 5 Star Review rating from Readers’ Favorite.

In the novel Baby Rocket, author Stephanie Smith takes an unusual and rewarding approach to telling the story. While taking care of matters following the death of her father, James Dance, Clementine ‘Lem’ Dance discovers a secret from her early childhood concerning herself and the death of her mother. This secret shatters many of her assumptions and long held beliefs. Lem embarks on two journeys as she attempts to find the truth. One journey is physical, taking her from California to Florida and New York and eventually New England. Along this journey, Lem renews acquaintance with family members and friends, and meets up with strangers. Some of these people are helpful while others are manipulative and only blur the search. The second journey is through Lem’s memory as she desperately tries to unravel her recollections of the events surrounding her mother’s death when Lem was just four years old. The reader feels the pain of this struggle.

Carefully woven into this story of a woman’s search for a childhood truth are two side issues from Lem’s father’s background. Because James Dance had a fixation on Marilyn Monroe, the reader learns a great deal about the actress, including a connection with James that the reader may not see coming! The second issue comes from the fact that James was a NASA worker and was very close to the early astronaut experiences at Cape Canaveral. Along with facts concerning those NASA events, the reader is introduced to the little known story of the so called “Mercury 13.” These were thirteen women who had been selected and trained to become astronauts until the administration ruled that women were unable to cope with the physical demands of launch and space travel. That ruling ensured that the American space program would exclusively be a male establishment up until the shuttle era. These historical issues are nicely and seamlessly written into the story of Lem Dance’s search. Baby Rocket is an intriguing story, skillfully and sensitively constructed by Stephanie Smith. It is recommended reading.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Jeffrey Brooke-Stewart – June 15, 2014
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Readers’ Favorite Reviews

Reviewed By Kathryn Bennett for Readers’ Favorite
This is one of three reviewers who awarded 5 stars from Readers’ Favorite.

5 star seal - Readers' Favorite

This book received a 5 Star Review rating from Readers’ Favorite.

Baby Rocket by Stephanie A. Smith introduces us to a child who was abandoned in 1966 at Cape Canaveral. She was traumatized and unable to speak to authorities when they found her as she was only a few yards from her dead mother. First responders dubbed her ‘Baby Rocket.’ When the child grew into an adult, Clementine, she had no memory of the event and only finds out after her adoptive father has a fatal heart attack. While cleaning out her father’s apartment, Lem finds files her father has kept and she must piece together the truth. She will take a journey in search of answers that will lead her to Martha’s Vineyard.

If you want a book that is captivating and well written, and that will show you what it is like to take a journey of self discovery, this is the book for you. Stephanie A. Smith has written a book that is well written, well edited, and simply dazzling with its story. I could not put it down from the moment I started it. Lem is an engaging character that makes you feel for the journey that she must take to find out the real story of her life. While it has a sweet touch of all that we love about Marilyn and the mythology around her, the true story that pulled me in is Lem’s. I have to applaud this book for making me forget everything around me as I read it. If you are looking for something to read that will truly bring enjoyment, look no further.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Kathryn Bennett – June 18, 2014
This review is from: Baby Rocket (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Readers’ Favorite Reviews


Warpaint

Warpaint, a novel by Stephanie A. Smith

Warpaint

Compelling… richly textured

This is a compelling and richly textured portrait of three women artists from overlapping generations. It’s a must read for anyone interested in painting or modernism, but it’s also a beautifully written story of fierce loves and friendships, with more than a little family drama added to the mix. And English and art nerds like me will enjoy all the little tidbits about Stein, the Fitzgeralds, etc. Place is also central – the book is set in New York and Connecticut and also Minnesota, and Smith gives the reader a vivid and visceral feel for setting. A superfast read – I can’t wait for two sequels!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Kenneth Kidd – December 16, 2012
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Enjoyable read

This book provides a refreshing depiction of the complicated relationships between women, and women of different generations. This is a must read for anyone interested in visual art, but the characters’ relationships to art can act as a metaphor for so many of life’s passions and challenges. Smith’s use of names is brilliant, as is her ability to seamlessly jump through time and geographic space. I can’t wait to read the next two books in the trilogy!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Sarah H – July 3, 2013
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Must read this novel about “a vibrato of three visions, fusing… into one”

History, art, intensity…and love. Smith illuminates to me a love between women that is so complex, beautiful, and strong. Through trials and sheer time, the three women artists at the center of this novel find common ground – sometimes contested – in their craft and in their moments of both sorrow and elation. The love between C.C. and Liz Moore, for example, is a bond that some can only imagine, yet Smith makes this real and possible. Liz Moore, “utterly unlike” any other, passes her wisdom, wit, and passion on to C.C. and on to the reader as well. You will relish her moments of resistance. And Smith weaves together scenes and images as if she is painting them brushstroke by brushstroke. Her writing intricately matches the magical abilities of her artist characters. Her narrative moves from time to time and from place to place in seamless fashion to show how the women of her story have deep histories that ultimately shape their identities and choices. Her characters are inspiring and resilient and bold. A touching and fast read, Smith will surprise you, make you laugh, and make you weep. This novel will resonate with you. Most importantly, Smith’s novel will make you want to embrace your individuality and hold on to it fiercely.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Electra Grey – February 24, 2013
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

A Powerful and Amazing Story

This is a remarkable story that shows the profound connection and impact of women from generation to generation. The organization of the novel is engaging, going from the characters’ present to their pasts, keeping the reader interested in a story unfolding over a tremendous timeline. The characters are all strong women that are easy to identify with and provoke an immediate relationship with the readers themselves. I loved this book and I’m really looking forward to the next in the series!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Kelly Burke – February 13, 2013
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Great Read!

I attended a book reading that the author gave a few months ago. The reading was lyrical and captivating- the book is no different. Within these pages exist beautifully drawn, multidimensional characters that come to life and inhabit your world. The relationships between these characters accurately capture the deeply complex and complicated nature of human relationships, in all their pain and pleasure. Smith’s characters and their relationships are shaped by U.S. history and grounded in the world of art, a framework that reflects the intertwinings and interconnectedness of our world. This novel–the characters and the storyline– will stay with you for a long time.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Kristin A. – January 18, 2013
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

A multilayered and enigmatic work

The close-knit friendship between the three women in Smith’s work is evocative of Margaret Atwood’s haunting novel “The Robber Bride.” Only in this case the women’s shared rival is not the evil Zenia but the challenges of family trauma, failed relationships, and the recognition for one’s creative work that so often arrives too late.

By kojak – December 13, 2012 – 5.0 out of 5 stars
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Thought provoking feminist fiction

An amalgamation of historical fiction about 20th century art and writing (Hemingway, Stieglitz) and an exploration of generations of women who alternately hide and reveal their attachments to each other… Smith writes evocatively of how art appeared in 20th century New York as a way to enter other identities, while weaving in a haunting story about premonitions and lost children.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Soledad “john93” – December 12, 2012
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

These women will live on in my heart

These women will live on in my heart and imagination long after this book has been put on the shelf. Bravo, Stephanie A. Smith—Bravo! Looking forward to the next one in the series! 🙂

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Natacha Maree – Jan 13, 2013
This review is from: Warpaint (Hardcover)
Read from December 31, 2012 to January 13, 2013
Reviewed at: Goodreads.com Reviews


Other Nature - a novel by Stephanie A. Smith

Other Nature – a novel by Stephanie A. Smith

Click-to-order-from-Amazon

James Tiptree Jr. Award WinnerJames Tiptree Jr. Award Nominee 1995

The James Tiptree Jr. Award is “an annual literary prize for science fiction or fantasy that expands or explores our understanding of gender.”

Other Nature

lyrical and disturbing

I read this overlooked classic around 10 years ago; scenes from it still haunt me and give me chills. S. A. Smith plays deftly with SF genre conventions and those of feminist science fiction to focus on questions of what it means to be human – not in the sense of “what it means to be human” in a speech of Captain Kirk, but instead in a way that made me think “How should I live my own life? What is important?” As post-apocalyptic fiction with brooding, thoughtful atmosphere it stands with John Crowley, Octavia Butler, Greg Bear, Gwyneth Jones, Peter Dickinson, Pat Murphy.

“But wait – this is just a story about some people in a small town community or some sort of Kim-Stanley-Robinson-esque hippie commune. Where is the science?” Well, yes. We all know what kind of novel would be written that focuses around the elided scenes in the protagonists’ visit to (and escape from) the dystopian post-apocalpyse San Francisco; it’s been written countless times. Here is the “other” story to that story. Very subtle and cool.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By E. Henry “geeklizzard” (Redwood City, CA United States) – June 21, 2005
This review is from: Other Nature (Hardcover)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

Wow…

I just finished reading _Other Nature_ about thirty minutes ago. I’m still in a bit of shock. It’s that good.

Stephanie A. Smith is relative rarity in the Science Fiction genre, an author who doesn’t insult your intelligence. You don’t catch the rich subtleties, tough. She isn’t going to shove your nose in it until you realize what she is trying to say.

The story, unlike so many science-fiction stories, doesn’t depend on a nifty little idea. It’s about people, and a small town.

This novel will probably be rejected by many, which is a shame. If more science fiction was like this, I would read it a lot more.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Jake Swearingen (jakes@webzone.net) (Tulsa, Oklahoma) – June 4, 1998
This review is from: Other Nature (Paperback)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

subtle, rich messages in this stark story

Stephanie Smith uses a possible (all too near) future to explore many subtleties about what it is to be human and to explore transcendence.

As Stephanie indicates in her own review, this book will not find it’s audience easily, its subtleties may elude many. On the other hand, I find it on par with the widely heralded, often quoted, seminal work in the same (sub) genre, A CANTICLE FOR LEIBOWITZ. I find this less of a post-disaster novel than a study in human nature through the exploration of not-quite or perhaps more-than human nature.

Anyone who is intrigued by the subtleties of complex human relations and with possible ways we might transcend ourselves as a species and culture should read this book.

Yes, it can be dark and stark but I found rich subtle messages woven into that weft. Whether read literally or as somewhat of an allegory, I found it to be rich in substance to reflect on.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By pi_in_sky@nets.com Steve (no-relation) Smith (Los Alamos, NM) – January 5, 1998
This review is from: Other Nature (Paperback)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Reviews

This book really surprised me

This book really surprised me. I’ve bought hundreds of books at our annual booksale here, and I got this one there for 50 cents. I think, now, it is one of the best purchases I have made.

The book starts out a little slow, but not in a bad way. Just a nice, steady pace. From there, it just builds and builds from a simple narrative into a fullblown “sci-fi” (it’s not high tech, but still counts), fast paced story. By the end, the story was progressing so rapidly and excitingly, that first I was on the edge of my seat, then I was up and pacing as I read it.

It ends sweetly and hopefully. I don’t like to give away details and spoilers in my reviews, and I won’t here, but I encourage everyone, Sci-Fi fans and non-fans alike, to read this.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Ichaerus – Nov 25, 2009
Shelves: 2009, books-i-own, post-apocalypse, science-fiction, favorites
This review is from: Other Nature
Reviewed at: Goodreads.com Reviews

This is a really weird young adult sci-fi

This is a really weird young adult sci-fi that leaves lots of unanswered questions and has a really strange twist (not much of a twist since it’s apparent pretty early on, but still). I liked it though, got sucked into it, and thought the writing was beautiful in parts and the world (a dystopian-type future world) really easy to bring to life.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Kris – Jul 05, 2011
This review is from: Other Nature
Reviewed at: Goodreads.com Reviews

This post-apocalyptic novel tells the story of a tiny community

This post-apocalyptic novel tells the story of a tiny community on the Oregon shore where the last few members of the human race are desperately clinging to each other, what memories are left of civilization and denial about how odd their children are. It’s dark and sad, but beautifully written, focusing on the intense and dangerous relationships between the characters.

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Cindy – Dec 30, 2007
Shelves: dark, fantasy-sf
This review is from: Other Nature
Reviewed at: Goodreads.com Reviews

Snow-Eyes - An novel by Stephanie A. Smith

Snow-Eyes – An novel by Stephanie A. Smith

Click-to-order-from-Amazon

Snow Eyes

Amarra Snow-Eyes

I loved the little touches that give the world more depth, such as the customs of the people which are revealed to us through Amarra’s life. The family relationships and conflicts are captivating, as is the detailed dream imagery. If you enjoy this book, there is another book set in the same world in which Amarra makes an appearance – “The Boy Who Was Thrown Away”

5.0 out of 5 stars
By J. Holscher (San Diego, California) – February 29, 2000
This review is from: Snow Eyes (Mass Market Paperback)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review

kids book great for adults too

This was my favorite book in sixth grade. I checked it out from the library a dozen times. recently I saw it in a used book store and couldn’t imagine not owning it. It is a beatuifuly sad coming-of-age story about a gil who is forced to follow into her mother’s goddess footsteps. As an adult I see my stuggle though the teenage years in snow eyes. Something, I didn’t realize when I read it as a kid.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By J. L.. “Jackie” (Portland, OR) – September 22, 1999
This review is from: Snow Eyes (Library Binding)
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review

I recently re-read this little novel

Like others here, I recently re-read this little novel after remembering having enjoyed it as a young person. I hoped that (unlike some awesomely bad 1980’s films) it would still prove to be as captivating now. In many ways it was.

The story is quite simple and almost sparse. Yet, the author has a true gift for lovely and memorable imagery. Only a few things bothered me. The first was when the protagonist first views the murals on the nidules that represent the Lake Mother. I thought the choices of color, and the phrases underneath, to be slightly ambiguous; I had hope that more on that would be explained later, but it wasn’t.

The other was that the ending seemed quite abrupt, and it felt like a few loose ends could’ve been tied up a little more pleasingly. (I actually had to go back and read the last few pages to remember exactly how it did end. Must not have been too memorable. Or perhaps I was very tired. 🙂 )

Overall, a book I highly recommend to a young or grown adult as an intriguing, smooth-reading novel.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Anjalique – Feb 15, 2013
This review is from: Snow Eyes
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review

Just reread this old favorite of mine

Just reread this old favorite of mine. Snow-Eyes is the daughter of a carpenter and a demigoddess, more or less. What I love about this book is the combination of the down-to-earth and the mystical; the social structure of the Kields, the farming and carpentry and cooking and cleaning, the mythology and the hints at more, the focus on family and family frailties. The social structure is egalitarian, no gender roles assigned: nothing is made of this, it’s just background.

Another fantasy novel from the 80s where the dark-skinned protagonist is shown on the cover as a white woman.

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Mely – Jan 26, 2011
Recommends it for: fans of Laurie Marks, Elizabeth Lynn, Ursula Le Guin
Shelves: sff, young-adult, favorites, fantasy
This review is from: Snow Eyes
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review

I liked it even if it was dark

I liked it even if it was dark and the story basically are about a girl who are abandon by her mother who disappoint her on one way after another in the whole story… first her mother, who Snow-eyes havn’t meet before, returns to take her with her, from her family, against her will. Soon Snow-Eyes discover that her mother are “The Lake Mother” who is a lore-spun woman who guides the souls to Death and grants wishes… and she begin her training to be one of The Lake Womens servitudes…

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Nighteye – Oct 12, 2012
Recommends it for: people who likes Ursula LeGuin
This review is from: Snow Eyes
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review

Nice, slow moving for the first half of the book before sudden scene and pace change

I think I may have read this in middle school, so I grabbed it to find out. I will keep you posted.

ETA: Yep, this is the one I remembered! Nice, slow moving for the first half of the book before sudden scene and pace change. Has a slightly sparse quality, in the style of LeGuin, although perhaps she just comes to mind because she’s given a blurb on the cover. Definitely YA, but as such, not bad.

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Brownbetty – Mar 20, 2008
This review is from: Snow Eyes
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review

About a little girl who is named Snow Eyes and her father always dresses his youngest child in black

This book is about a little girl who is named Snow Eyes and her father always dresses his youngest child in black. Her eyes are as black as her clothes too. She always gets abused by her oldest sister and Snow Eyes tells her father but her father doesn’t believe her.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Mackenzie Lee – Nov 09, 2007
Recommends it for: People who like Fantasy
This review is from: Snow Eyes
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review

A childhood favorite

A childhood favorite. I must have read Snow Eyes a dozen times when I was 12. Good for some literary comfort food even now.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Jackie – Nov 03, 2012
Shelves: fantasy, fiction, orphans-and-runaways, time-travel, young-adult, comfort-reads
This review is from: Snow Eyes
Reviewed at: Amazon.com Customer Review